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More “communication” may just be more dubious data

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Many people will have seen the saturation advertising on the Commonwealth Government’s “Plan for Better Schools”. One of the key points in this campaign is “Better Communication with Parents”, so I thought I would have a look at the website to read more. Imagine my surprise when the only reference I could find was a section on “More Information for Parents” about more data on the My Schools website, information which schools already provide in their Annual Report on each school’s website.

This raises the question of the difference between information and communication. There is already information overload and governments seem obsessed with data. Schools no doubt will be required to supply more statistical data. However, does this really mean parents will have better communication with their children’s schools?

Good communication involves both speaking and listening. All parents from time to time have concerns about their children’s experience at school whether it is academic, social or behavioural. For these concerns to be addressed there has to be opportunity for communication, which is a two-way thing, whereas the data avalanche is all one way, from the top down.

Schools need to be approachable and to provide a variety of opportunities for parents to engage with teachers and the school leadership about the progress and well being of their children.

Will self-management produce real leadership?

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

The Education Minister, John Paul Langbroek, recently announced the 26 schools which will pilot the Queensland Independent Public Schools program.  These schools, “are to have the freedom to directly recruit teachers and to build a team that is able to deliver innovative educational practices, as well as having more autonomy to manage infrastructure and financial resources”.

The issue with this policy is that while the rhetoric supports autonomy, the amount of independence and self-management is limited. Indeed, financial support to help this process is only $50,000 start up and $50,000 annually per school. No doubt there are also expectations on the part of the state government that these autonomous schools will show efficiencies and improvements on various measures.

Autonomy and self-management are positive ideas and if genuinely implemented could give principals and their leadership teams greater ability to respond to the educational needs of their students. However, there can be a problem if they are simply being given more of the responsibility but not much more power or resources.

Self-management does not mean that the principal can do what he or she likes. Principals will have to work with a school council which will be made up of community members, school parents and nominated representatives.

All of this focuses on the role of the principal as a manager when perhaps a more important role is the principal as an educational leader who can ensure that programs in his or her school are really meeting the needs of their students in terms of their academic, physical and even more important their character development.

It is to be hoped that principals will be given sufficient and appropriate training so that they can meet the very challenging requirements of being a self-managing leader.

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